Translating a health behavior change intervention for delivery to 2-year college students: the importance of formative research

Jennifer A. Linde, Sarah M. Sevcik, Christine A. Petrich, Jolynn K. Gardner, Melissa N. Laska, Paula Lozano, Leslie A. Lytle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Young adults are at risk for weight gain in the transition to independent adulthood; 2-year college students are at greater risk and understudied relative to 4-year students. This project conducted formative research for a randomized controlled weight gain prevention trial among 2-year college students, to ensure appropriateness of content and delivery of a curriculum originally developed for 4-year college students. Data were collected from community college students, faculty, and staff from October 2009 to August 2011. Work included focus groups and key informant interviews, curriculum pilot testing, and social network and support website beta testing. Based on focus groups and interviews, program content, course delivery modes, and communication channels were adjusted to meet population interests and preferences. The course was delivered successfully in pilot testing, and the website was received well by beta testers. Formative work successfully guided program adaptations to address population needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-169
Number of pages10
JournalTranslational behavioral medicine
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2014

Keywords

  • Curriculum development
  • Formative research
  • Intervention delivery
  • Obesity prevention
  • Young adults

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