Transitions in smoking behavior during emerging adulthood: A longitudinal analysis of the effect of home smoking bans

Charu Mathur, Melissa H. Stigler, Darin J. Erickson, Cheryl L. Perry, Jean L. Forster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. We studied the effect of home smoking bans on transitions in smoking behavior during emerging adulthood. Methods. We used latent transition analysis to examine movement between stages of smoking from late adolescence (ages 16-18 years) to young adulthood (ages 18-20 years) and the effect of a home smoking ban on these transitions. We used data from the Minnesota Adolescent Community Cohort study collected in 2004 to 2006. Results. Overall, we identified 4 stages of smoking: (1) never smokers, (2) experimental smokers, (3) light smokers, and (4) daily smokers. Transition probabilities varied by stage. Young adults with a home ban during late adolescence were less likely to be smokers and less likely to progress to higher use later. Furthermore, the protective effect of a home smoking ban on the prevalence of smoking behavior was evident even in the presence of parental smoking. However, this effect was less clear on transitions over time. Conclusions. In addition to protecting family members from exposure to secondhand smoke, home smoking bans appear to have the additional benefit of reducing initiation and escalation of smoking behavior among young adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)715-720
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume104
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

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