Transfer of Cornus florida and C. kousa simple sequence repeats to selected Cornus (Cornaceae) species

Phillip A. Wadl, Xinwang Wang, John K. Moulton, Stan C. Hokanson, John A. Skinner, Timothy A. Rinehart, Sandra M. Reed, Vincent R. Pantalone, Robert N. Trigiano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cross-species transferability of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) is common and allows SSRs isolated from one species to be applied to closely related species, increasing the use of previously isolated SSRs. The genus Cornus consists of 58 species that are ecologically and economically important. SSRs have previously been isolated from C. florida and C. kousa. In this study, 36 SSRs were tested on taxa from 18 Cornus species and hybrids for cross-species transferability and genetic diversity was calculated for each locus using polymorphism information content (PIC). Cross-species transferability of SSR loci was higher in more closely related species and PIC values were high. Evidence was found for conserved primer sites as determined by the amplification of SSR loci in the taxa examined. Polymerase chain reaction products were cloned and sequenced for three SSR loci (CF48, CF59, and CF124) and all individuals sequenced contained the appropriate repeat. Phylogenetic relationships of 14 Cornus species were inferred using nucleotide sequences of SSR locus CF48. The most parsimonious tree resulting from this analysis was in concordance with phylogenies based on matK and internal transcribed spacer sequences. The SSR loci tested in this study will be useful in future breeding, population, and genetic studies within Cornus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-288
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Society for Horticultural Science
Volume135
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

Keywords

  • Cross-species transferability
  • Dogwood
  • Microsatellites
  • Polymorphic information content
  • Ssr

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