Training and organizational commitment among nurses following industry and organizational change in new zealand and the united states

Kenneth R. Bartlett, Dae Seok Kang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

This survey study examines the relationship between employee attitudes related to training and organizational commitment among a sample of nurses in New Zealand and the United States. The magnitude of recent restructuring to New Zealand’s public health system allows for an examination of employee attitudes towards training and organizational commitment in comparison to nurses from similar sized hospitals in the United States. Results show that perceived access to training, supervisory support for training, motivation to learn from training and perceived benefits of training were positively related to the affective and normative components of organizational commitment. Several significant differences were found on both training and organizational commitment variables between New Zealand and the United States. The findings are discussed in terms of their theoretical and practical application to human resource development (HRD) outcomes and the management of HRD in health care settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)423-440
Number of pages18
JournalHuman Resource Development International
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004

Keywords

  • Health care industry
  • New zealand
  • Organizational commitment
  • Training
  • United states

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