Toward analysis of the relations among the youth counterculture, telephone hotlines, and anonymity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During the 1960s, there emerged a youth culture which had two major orientations: the Counterculture and the Movement. We are well informed about this youth culture, its social values, social norms, and emergent social roles (e.g., "hippie", "freak", "radical", "dropout"). Part of these social and political movements was the creation of "alternative", "counterculture", or "radical" human service programs. Early examples were free medical clinics, drop-in centers, and telephone hotlines. Among the actual differences in these programs compared to older, "established" human service agencies was (is) the prominent position of the social value of client anonymity. This notion of client anonymity is examined in the attempt to understand its role in the relations among themes of the Counterculture, individual youth, their peers, and youth-serving agencies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-306
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1974

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Hotlines
anonymity
subculture
telephone
youth culture
Social Values
Social Norms and Values
political movement
Social Role
drop-out
Values

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Toward analysis of the relations among the youth counterculture, telephone hotlines, and anonymity. / Baizerman, Michael L.

In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, Vol. 3, No. 4, 01.12.1974, p. 293-306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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