Tooth replacement and attachment morphology in the Pacific Leaping Blenny, Alticus arnoldorum (Blenniiformes: Blenniidae: Salariini) with a discussion on tooth function

Keiffer L. Williams, Kory M. Evans, Andrew M. Simons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Modes of teleost tooth replacement and attachment have historically been described using discrete classification systems that categorize major patterns across taxa. While useful, these discrete classification schemes understate teleost tooth diversity. The “unattached” dentition of salariin combtooth blennies (Blenniiformes: Blenniidae: Salariini) is frequently overlooked due to its perceived complexity, so we examined the Pacific Leaping Blenny, Alticus arnoldorum, to describe this complex morphology. Using a range of methods including histology, SEM, microCT scanning, and clearing and staining, we establish a descriptive model of tooth replacement for A. arnoldorum. We then use our descriptive model of tooth replacement to propose a hypothesis of tooth function in salariin blennies. Our results show that A. arnoldorum exhibits grouped, extraosseous replacement of feeding teeth upon a discontinuous, permanent dental lamina. We also find that tooth replacement occurs within lip tissue that is laterally displaced from the distal margins of the jaw bones, a process previously undocumented in teleost fish. Feeding teeth attach to the dentigerous bone via a primary attachment mode consisting of a continuous collagen band at the posterior base of the teeth, and a secondary attachment mode consisting of epithelial cells. Alticus arnoldorum presents novel modes of tooth replacement and attachment that challenge historical classification modes of teleost dentition. Our descriptive tooth replacement model also provides a reliable framework to propose hypotheses of tooth function that can be applied in future comparative studies on salariin blennies and other long-toothed teleosts to further elucidate the functional role of long-toothed fishes in aquatic ecosystems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1787-1803
Number of pages17
JournalAnatomical Record
Volume305
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors are grateful to P.J. Hundt for thoughtful discussions on blenny teeth and clearing and staining. The authors thank L.J. Raymundo for coordinating laboratory use and housing during fieldwork to collect data for this research. The authors also thank K.E. Cohen and K.E. Bemis for comments on histology, and for lending their expert knowledge and training in histology and SEM methods. In addition, the authors thank M.A. Kolmann and J.M. Huie for their expertise and training in microCT methods, and A. E. Summers for the use of his laboratory space. Funding to support this research was provided by the University of Minnesota John Dobie Memorial Fellowship, Bell Museum of Natural History McKinney Fund, Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, American Museum of Natural History Lerner‐Gray Memorial Fund, and the University of Washington Stephen and Ruth Wainwright Endowed Fellowship. SEM data were collected at FHL Histology Workshop funded by the Company of Biologists and the Gans Collections and Charitable Fund grants awarded to K.E. Cohen and K.E. Bemis 2019.

Funding Information:
The authors are grateful to P.J. Hundt for thoughtful discussions on blenny teeth and clearing and staining. The authors thank L.J. Raymundo for coordinating laboratory use and housing during fieldwork to collect data for this research. The authors also thank K.E. Cohen and K.E. Bemis for comments on histology, and for lending their expert knowledge and training in histology and SEM methods. In addition, the authors thank M.A. Kolmann and J.M. Huie for their expertise and training in microCT methods, and A. E. Summers for the use of his laboratory space. Funding to support this research was provided by the University of Minnesota John Dobie Memorial Fellowship, Bell Museum of Natural History McKinney Fund, Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, American Museum of Natural History Lerner-Gray Memorial Fund, and the University of Washington Stephen and Ruth Wainwright Endowed Fellowship. SEM data were collected at FHL Histology Workshop funded by the Company of Biologists and the Gans Collections and Charitable Fund grants awarded to K.E. Cohen and K.E. Bemis 2019.

Funding Information:
Gans Collections and Charitable Fund; Company of Biologists; University of Washington Stephen and Ruth Wainwright Endowed Fellowship; American Museum of Natural History Lerner‐Gray Memorial Fund; Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station; Bell Museum of Natural History McKinney Fund; University of Minnesota John Dobie Memorial Fellowship Funding information

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 American Association for Anatomy.

Keywords

  • Blenniidae
  • dental lamina
  • extraosseous tooth replacement
  • histology
  • microCT

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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