'Too much good news' - are Alzheimer mouse models trying to tell us how to prevent, not cure, Alzheimer's disease?

Kathleen R. Zahs, Karen H. Ashe

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

121 Scopus citations

Abstract

Scores of compounds ameliorate cognitive deficits or neuropathology in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), yet these triumphs in mice have not translated into successful therapies for people. Why have studies in mice failed to predict results of human trials? We argue that most transgenic mouse 'models of AD' actually simulate the asymptomatic phase of the disease, and the results of interventional studies in these mice should be considered in the context of disease prevention. In addition, recent advances in imaging technology and biomarker discovery should aid in comparisons of mouse and human neurological status and, importantly, might allow us to predict better the response of people to drugs tested in mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)381-389
Number of pages9
JournalTrends in Neurosciences
Volume33
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was funded by grants from the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the National Institute on Aging, the National Institute for Mental Health, and gifts from B. Grossman, and E.W. and A.M Tulloch.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of ''Too much good news' - are Alzheimer mouse models trying to tell us how to prevent, not cure, Alzheimer's disease?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this