To weigh or not to weigh: The relationship between self-weighing behavior and body image among adults

Lori A. Klos, Valerie E. Esser, Molly M. Kessler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Given the high prevalence of overweight and obesity in the U.S., identifying behaviors that aid or hinder weight control efforts continues to be a research priority. Body weight monitoring is a technique used in many popular weight management programs. However, how weight monitoring-particularly self-weighing behavior-relates to psychological constructs like body image is poorly understood. Participants included 268 undergraduates (190 women, 78 men) at a midwestern university who completed questionnaires about self-weighing behavior and body image (Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire; Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire: Weight and Shape Concern subscales). Among women, more frequent self-weighing was associated with greater Appearance Orientation, Overweight Preoccupation, and Shape Concern. Among men, more frequent self-weighing was associated with greater Body Areas Satisfaction, Health and Fitness Orientation, and positive Health Evaluation. Results suggest that self-weighing is a fairly common behavior, but its relationship with body image is complex and gender-specific.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)551-554
Number of pages4
JournalBody Image
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported in part by a SEED grant from the College of Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee awarded to L. Klos.

Copyright:
Copyright 2013 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Body image
  • Body weight monitoring
  • Cross-sectional study
  • Descriptive research
  • Self-weighing

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