To comply or not comply: Testing the self-perception explanation of the "foot-in-the-door" phenomenon

Mark Snyder, Michael R. Cunningham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Scopus citations

Abstract

Conducted a field experiment to test the self-perception explanation of the "foot-in-the-door" phenomenon of increased compliance with a substantial request after prior compliance with a smaller demand. In this study, 30 Ss were first approached with a small request (answer 8 questions in a telephone survey) the size of which was virtually certain to guarantee compliance. 32 other Ss were first approached with a request sufficiently large to guarantee noncompliance (answer 50 questions). Ss in both of these conditions were subsequently approached with a moderately sized request (30 questions sponsored by a different public service organization). As predicted by self-perception theory, Ss in the small-initial-request condition showed a higher rate of compliance to the 2nd request (.519), whereas Ss in the large-initial-request condition showed a lower rate of compliance (.219) than Ss in the no-initial-request control condition (.333). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-67
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1975

Keywords

  • compliance vs noncompliance, compliance with 2nd request, test of self-perception theory of "foot-in-the-door" phenomena
  • large vs small initial request &

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