Time-restricted eating did not alter insulin sensitivity or β-cell function in adults with obesity: A randomized pilot study

Anne E. Bantle, Kheng Joe Lau, Qi Wang, Samar Malaeb, Tasma Harindhanavudhi, Emily N.C. Manoogian, Satchidananda Panda, Douglas G. Mashek, Lisa S. Chow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Decreased insulin sensitivity and impairment of β-cell function predate and predict development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Time-restricted eating (TRE) might have a benefit for these parameters. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate this possibility. Methods: Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing 12 weeks of TRE (8-hour eating window) to unrestricted eating (non-TRE) was performed. Participants were adults with overweight or obesity and without diabetes. Two-hour oral glucose tolerance testing was performed at baseline and end-intervention. Glucose tolerance test-derived measures of insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and β-cell function were compared between groups. Results: Participants (17 women/3 men with mean [SD] age 45.5 [12.1] years and BMI 34.1 [7.5] kg/m2) with a prolonged eating window (15.4 [0.9] hours) were randomized to TRE (n = 11) or non-TRE (n = 9). The quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), Stumvoll index, Avignon index, insulinogenic index, insulin area under the curve/glucose area under the curve, and oral disposition index did not differ between the TRE and non-TRE groups at end-intervention. Conclusions: In adults with overweight or obesity and without diabetes, TRE did not significantly alter insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, or β-cell function over a 12-week intervention. Whether TRE is beneficial in adults with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes mellitus warrants further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)108-115
Number of pages8
JournalObesity
Volume31
Issue numberS1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Healthy Foods Healthy Lives Program (17SFR‐2YR50LC to LSC), the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (UL1TR002494), and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (K23DK115906 to AEB). SP and ENCM are supported by NIH grants DK118278, DK124484, AG065569 and The Larry Hillblom Foundation network grant. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH, the Larry Hillblom Foundation, or the Healthy Foods Healthy Lives Program.

Funding Information:
Larry Hillblom Foundation network grant; National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, Grant/Award Number: UL1TR002494; National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Grant/Award Numbers: DK118278, DK124484, K23DK115906; National Institute on Aging, Grant/Award Number: AG065569; University of Minnesota Healthy Foods, Healthy Lives Program, Grant/Award Number: 17SFR‐2YR50LC Funding information

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors. Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of The Obesity Society.

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Randomized Controlled Trial

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