Time-restricted eating alters food intake patterns, as prospectively documented by a smartphone application

Samar Malaeb, Tasma Harindhanavudhi, Katrina Dietsche, Nick Esch, Emily N.C. Manoogian, Satchidananda Panda, Douglas Mashek, Qi Wang, Lisa S. Chow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Time-restricted eating (TRE) can facilitate weight loss, yet its effect on eating patterns remains unknown. Twenty adults with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 underwent a 12-week randomized trial, examining the effect of an 8-h, time-restricted eating intervention on dietary patterns. Oral intake was documented using a smartphone. Dietary patterns, assessed as frequency of eating occasions (EOs) and types of meals/snacks and beverages, were compared between baseline (T0), early-intervention (T1), and end-intervention (T2). At T1 and T2, both groups had less EOs compared to T0, with greater reduction seen in the TRE group (−28%) than the non-TRE group (−12%) at T2 (p = 0.01 vs. non-TRE). Comparing T1 to T0, the TRE group documented less incomplete meals (−32.5%: p = 0.02), high quality snacks (−23.6%: p = 0.03), and low quality snacks (−36.6%: p = 0.004). Comparing T2 to T0, the TRE group documented less incomplete meals (−33.9%: p = 0.03), high quality snacks (−28.1%: p < 0.001) and low quality snacks (−51.2%: p < 0.001). Caffeinated beverage intake was reduced in the TRE group at T1 (−20.2%) and T2 (−28.8%) vs. T0, but remained unaltered in the non-TRE group. By using a smartphone application to document dietary intake, TRE significantly reduced the number of EOs, snacks, and caffeinated beverages, relative to baseline and relative to the non-TRE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3396
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalNutrients
Volume12
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 5 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding: The original study was funded by the Healthy Foods Healthy Lives program (17SFR-2YR50LC to LC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, UL1TR002494). However, this secondary analysis of effects on alterations in diet quality received no external funding.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. T.

Keywords

  • Dietary patterns
  • Eating occasions
  • Time-restricted eating

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Journal Article

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