Time of day, intellectual performance, and behavioral problems in Morning versus Evening type adolescents: Is there a synchrony effect?

David Goldstein, Constanze S. Hahn, Lynn Hasher, Ursula J. Wiprzycka, Philip David Zelazo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

173 Scopus citations

Abstract

We administered measures of fluid and crystallized intelligence to Morning- and Evening-type adolescents who were tested either during a morning session or an afternoon session, at times chosen to reflect the limits of the average school day schedule. For the fluid intelligence measures, there was a synchrony effect, with better performance at times that matched individuals' preferences. A composite measure of the subtests used (block design, digit span, and vocabulary) computed to a 6 point difference in IQ estimates. We also assessed the behavioral adjustment of these participants and found heightened levels of maladaptive behavior for Evening-type adolescents. Adolescents tested at their nonoptimal times of day and adolescents who are Evening-types appear to be at risk for poor academic performance and Evening-types appear to be at risk for behavioral adjustment problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)431-440
Number of pages10
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Chronotype
  • Intellectual performance
  • Synchrony effect
  • Time of day

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