Thirty-minute continuous sitting force measurements with different support surfaces in the spinal cord injured and able-bodied

P. Gilsdorf, R. Patterson, S. Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Able-bodied, paraplegic, and quadriplegic subjects sat for 30-minute intervals on various surfaces in a wheelchair with a forceplate mounted on the seat in order to determine factors that could contribute to the formation of decubitus ulcers. All three groups of subjects sat on ROHO and Jay cushions; in addition to sitting on the two cushions, the able-bodied subjects sat on a hard surface. Factors studied were: normal and shear seat forces, the location of the center of mass, and armrest force. The forceplate was under the cushions; therefore, the values reflect average forces over the buttocks and posterior thighs. These factors were compared between disability levels as well as between surface types. Larger, normal, and forward shear forces and a more anterior position of the center of mass were observed with the ROHO cushion. More frequent and larger lateral weight shifts occurred with the Jay cushion. The armrests tended to support from 5 percent of the body weight for quadriplegics to 9 percent for paraplegics. The results suggest that armrests reduce seat forces by carrying some of the body weight.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-38
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

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