Think different: Increasing online community participation using uniqueness and group dissimilarity

Pamela J. Ludford, Dan Cosley, Dan Frankowski, Loren G Terveen

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

100 Scopus citations

Abstract

Online communities can help people form productive relationships Unfortunately, this potential is not always fulfilled: many communities fail, and designers don't have a solid understanding of why. We know community activity begets activity. The trick, however, is to inspire participation in the first place. Social theories suggest methods to spark positive community participation. We carried out a field experiment that tested two such theories. We formed discussion communities around an existing movie recommendation web site, manipulating two factors: (1) similarity - we controlled how similar group members' movie ratings were; and (2) uniqueness - we told members how their movie ratings (with respect to a discussion topic) were unique within the group. Both factors positively influenced participation. The results offer a practical success story in applying social science theory to the design of online communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages631-638
Number of pages8
StatePublished - Oct 1 2004
Event2004 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, CHI 2004 - Vienna, Austria
Duration: Apr 24 2004Apr 29 2004

Other

Other2004 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, CHI 2004
CountryAustria
CityVienna
Period4/24/044/29/04

Keywords

  • Online communities
  • Recommender systems
  • Similarity
  • Social psychology
  • Uniqueness

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Think different: Increasing online community participation using uniqueness and group dissimilarity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this