The well-being of African American adolescents within formal and informal adoption arrangements

Priscilla A. Gibson, Justine Nelson-Christinedaughter, Harold D. Grotevant, Hee Kyung Kwon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study assessed the well-being of African American adolescents in formal (n = 67) and informal (n = 194) adoption arrangements using Waves I and III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Controlling for demographic and early risk factors, the outcomes of adolescents in the two adoption groups were more similar than different. Adoption type was not a statistically significant predictor for nine of eleven indicators of adolescent well-being. Significant differences were found on only two indicators: anti-social behavior and adolescents' perception of how much their caregivcrs and family care about them. Informally adopted youth had more favorable outcomes on these indicators, although the effect sizes were small. Implications of this study are forwarded for policy and practice in child welfare.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-78
Number of pages22
JournalAdoption Quarterly
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Investigators gratefully acknowledge support provided by grant HD36479 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, to Brent C. Miller, P.I., through a Minority Supplement to Priscilla A. Gibson, University of Minnesota.

Funding Information:
This research uses data from Add Health, a program project designed by J. Richard Udry, Peter S. Bearman, and Kathleen Mullan Harris, and funded by a grant P01-HD31921 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, with cooperative funding from 17 other agencies. Special acknowledgment is due Ronald R. Rindfuss and Barbara Entwisle for assistance in the original design. Persons interested in obtaining data files from Add Health should contact Add Health, Carolina Population Center, 123 W. Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27516-2524 (www.cpc.unc. edu/addhealth/contract.html The authors wish to thank Yat-Sang Lum of the School of Social Work and Erin Morgan and Lynn Von Korff of the Department of Family Social Science, University of Minnesota for their valuable consultation on this project.

Copyright:
Copyright 2011 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Add Health data
  • Adolescents' well-being
  • Adoption
  • African Americans

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The well-being of African American adolescents within formal and informal adoption arrangements'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this