The validity of the graduate record examination for master's and doctoral programs: A meta-analytic investigation

Nathan R Kuncel, Serena Wee, Lauren Serafin, Sarah A. Hezlett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Extensive research has examined the effectiveness of admissions tests for use in higher education. What has gone unexamined is the extent to which tests are similarly effective for predicting performance at both the master's and doctoral levels. This study empirically synthesizes previous studies to investigate whether or not the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) predicts the performance of students in master's programs as well as the performance of doctoral students. Across nearly 100 studies and 10,000 students, this study found that GRE scores predict first year grade point average (GPA), graduate GPA, and faculty ratings well for both master's and doctoral students, with differences that ranged from small to zero.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)340-352
Number of pages13
JournalEducational and Psychological Measurement
Volume70
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010

Keywords

  • Admissions tests
  • GRE
  • Graduate Record Examination
  • Graduate school
  • Meta-analysis
  • Standardized tests
  • Validity

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