The use of writing in the apparel curriculum: A preliminary investigation

Kim K.P. Johnson, Jennifer Yurchisin, Denise L. Bean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Writing activities can be used throughout the apparel curriculum to promote successful learning and to develop and improve students' written and verbal communication skills. As a result of a mandate from our university to incorporate writing-intensive courses within our apparel curriculum, this descriptive study was designed to investigate the amount and types of writing currently required within undergraduate apparel curricula within the United States. We used a questionnaire to survey instructors representing 34 institutions that offered undergraduate apparel programs. The data for 136 courses are presented. Writing was a component of both required assignments and examinations. An in-class essay was the primary type of writing used on exams. The majority of courses had at least one written assignment. Written assignments were primarily research projects or papers, out-of-class essays, and reading reports. Overall, respondents indicated that the amount of writing required in apparel courses was about right but very few respondents indicated these courses had been approved as "writing intensive." More respondents agreed that requiring additional writing would help students develop necessary workplace skills than agreed that requiring additional writing would help students master key course concepts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-48
Number of pages8
JournalClothing and Textiles Research Journal
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

Keywords

  • Curriculum
  • Undergraduate education
  • Writing-to-learnΩriting intensive

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