The use of race and ethnicity in medicine: Lessons from the African-American Heart Failure Trial

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Race or ethnic identity, despite its imprecise categorization, is a useful means of identifying population differences in mechanisms of disease and treatment effects. Therefore, race and other arbitrary demographic and physiological variables have appropriately served as a helpful guide to clinical management and to clinical trial participation. The African-American Heart Failure Trial was carried out in African-Americans with heart failure because prior data had demonstrated a uniquely favorable effect in this subpopulation of the drug combination in BiDil. The remarkable effect of the drug in reducing mortality in this study has illuminated an important new mechanism of therapy for heart failure. Application of these findings need not be confined to the population studied, but the observation highlights the need for more precise ways to identify individual responsiveness to therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)552-554
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Law, Medicine and Ethics
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

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African Americans
ethnicity
Heart Failure
Medicine
medicine
drug
Drug Combinations
ethnic identity
Population
Therapeutics
mortality
Observation
Demography
Clinical Trials
Disease
participation
Mortality
management
Pharmaceutical Preparations
American

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The use of race and ethnicity in medicine : Lessons from the African-American Heart Failure Trial. / Cohn, Jay N.

In: Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics, Vol. 34, No. 3, 01.09.2006, p. 552-554.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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