The use of grounded theory to investigate the role of teacher education on STEM teachers' career paths in high-need schools

Allison Kirchhoff, Frances Lawrenz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

An inductive grounded theory approach was used to investigate the role of teacher education on the career paths of 38 Noyce scholarship recipients ("scholars"), most of whom were teaching in high-need schools. The emergent research design was guided by the initial research question: "What are Noyce scholars' reasons for the decisions made on the career paths of becoming and remaining teachers in high-need schools?" In-depth interviews were conducted and analyzed, resulting in a theoretical model of their career paths that revealed that some components of teacher education played a role in the scholars' career paths. Specifically, the role of teacher education programs in providing ongoing support and specific preparation for high-need settings was influential on the scholars' career paths.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-259
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Teacher Education
Volume62
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

Bibliographical note

Copyright:
Copyright 2011 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • at-risk schools/students
  • methodology
  • urban teacher education

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