The UNI1 and UNI2 genes function in the transition of triplet to doublet microtubules between the centriole and cilium in Chlamydomonas

Brian P. Piasecki, Carolyn D. Silflow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

One fundamental role of the centriole in eukaryotic cells is to nucleate the growth of cilia. The unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provides a simple genetic system to study the role of the centriole in ciliogenesis. Wild-type cells are biflagellate, but "uni" mutations result in failure of some centrioles (basal bodies) to assemble cilia (flagella). Serial transverse sections through basal bodies in uni1 and uni2 single and double mutant cells revealed a previously undescribed defect in the transition of triplet microtubules to doublet microtubules, a defect correlated with failure to assemble flagella. Phosphorylation of the Uni2 protein is reduced in uni1 mutant cells. Immunogold electron microscopy showed that the Uni2 protein localizes at the distal end of the basal body where microtubule transition occurs. These results provide the first mechanistic insights into the function of UNI1 and UNI2 genes in the pathway mediating assembly of doublet microtubules in the axoneme from triplet microtubules in the basal body template.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)368-378
Number of pages11
JournalMolecular biology of the cell
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

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