The tyranny of content: “content coverage” as a barrier to evidence-based teaching approaches and ways to overcome it

Christina I. Petersen, Paul Baepler, Al Beitz, Paul Ching, Kristen S. Gorman, Cheryl L. Neudauer, William Rozaitis, J. D. Walker, Deb Wingert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Instructors have inherited a model for conscientious instruction that suggests they must cover all the material outlined in their syllabus, and yet this model frequently diverts time away from allowing students to engage meaningfully with the content during class. We outline the historical forces that may have conditioned this teacher-centered model as well as the disciplinary pressures that inadvertently reward it. As a way to guide course revision and move to a learner-centered teaching approach, we propose three evidence-based strategies that instructors can adopt: 1) identify the core concepts and competencies for your course; 2) create an organizing framework for the core concepts and competencies; and 3) teach students how to learn in your discipline. We further outline examples of actions that instructors can incorporate to implement each of these strategies. We propose that moving from a content-coverage approach to these learner-centered strategies will help students better learn and retain information and apply it to new situations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number17
JournalCBE life sciences education
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 C. I. Petersen et al.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The tyranny of content: “content coverage” as a barrier to evidence-based teaching approaches and ways to overcome it'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this