The 'tribal politics' of field research: A reflection on power and partiality in 21st-century warzones

Romain Malejacq, Dipali Mukhopadhyay

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Can fieldwork still be done in today's most violent warzones? We contend that long-held methodological principles about power and impartiality do not hold in today's conflict-ridden environments. Research of this kind can still be pursued, but only if the scholar's place is reconceived as one of limited power and unavoidable partiality. We argue that those still able to do fieldwork in sites of increasing danger do so by virtue of building their own 'tribes,' forming and joining different social micro-systems to collect data and, in some cases, survive. Field research must, therefore, be recognized as its own form of foreign intervention. In considering the future of political science research in the most challenging war-Torn settings, we examine the risks and opportunities that accompany 'tribal politics' of this kind and underline the importance of reflecting on our own positionality in the process of knowledge production.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1011-1028
Number of pages18
JournalPerspectives on Politics
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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