The taxonomic status of myotis nesopolus larensis (Chiroptera, vespertilionidae) and new insights on the diversity of caribbean myotis

Roberto Leonan M. Novaes, Vinícius C. Cláudio, Roxanne J. Larsen, Don E. Wilson, Marcelo Weksler, Ricardo Moratelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Myotis nesopolus currently comprises two subspecies. The nominate subspecies (M. n. nesopolus) occurs on the Caribbean islands of Curaçao and Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles, whereas M. n. larensis is known from mainland South America in northeastern Colombia and northwestern Venezuela. Our Maximum Likelihood phylogenetic analyses of cytochrome-b gene sequences recovered M. nesopolus as a paraphyletic group, with M. n. nesopolus and M. n. larensis as non-sister lineages. The haplotype network indicates that these two subspecies do not share any haplotypes and are in different evolutionary trajectories. Addition-ally, these two subspecies can be distinguished on the basis of qualitative and quantitative morphological traits. This pattern supports the recognition of M. nesopolus and M. larensis as full species. Our results also reveal that the assemblage of Caribbean Myotis do not form a monophyletic group. Caribbean species are phylogenetically close to mainland species from northern South America and Central America, suggesting that colonization of Caribbean islands happened multiple times.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-167
Number of pages23
JournalZooKeys
Volume2021
Issue number1015
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We are grateful to G. Garbino, B. Lim, and C. Carrión-Bonilla for the valuable revision of the original text. Support for RLMN and VCC (Ph.D. scholarships) comes from the Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES, Brazil). RM has received support from National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq, Brazil), and from the Smithsonian Institution (USA). This paper is part of Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel the Ph.D. requirements of at the Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology Graduate Program of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro.

Funding Information:
We are grateful to G. Garbino, B. Lim, and C. Carri?n-Bonilla for the valuable revision of the original text. Support for RLMN and VCC (Ph.D. scholarships) comes from the Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES, Brazil). RM has received support from National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq, Brazil), and from the Smithsonian Institution (USA). This paper is part of Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel the Ph.D. requirements of at the Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology Graduate Program of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro.

Publisher Copyright:
© Roberto L. M. Novaes et al.

Copyright:
Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Bats
  • Biogeography
  • Lesser Antilles
  • Morphology
  • Morphometry
  • South America
  • Taxonomy
  • Venezuela

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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