The structurally related auxin and melatonin tryptophan-derivatives and their roles in Arabidopsis thaliana and in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

Fernanda C. Koyama, Thais L.G. Carvalho, Eduardo Alves, Henrique B. Da Silva, Mauro F. De Azevedo, Adriana S. Hemerly, Célia R.S. Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

Indole compounds are involved in a range of functions in many organisms. In the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, melatonin and other tryptophan derivatives are able to modulate its intraerythrocytic cycle, increasing the schizont population as well as parasitemia, likely through ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) gene regulation. In plants, melatonin regulates root development, in a similar way to that described for indoleacetic acid, suggesting that melatonin and indoleacetic acid could co-participate in some physiological processes due to structural similarities. In the present work, we evaluate whether the chemical structure similarity found in indoleacetic acid and melatonin can lead to similar effects in Arabidopsis thaliana lateral root formation and P. falciparum cell cycle modulation, as well as in the UPS of gene regulation, by qRT-PCR. Our data show that P. falciparum is not able to respond to indoleacetic acid either in the modulation of the intraerythrocytic cycle or in the gene regulation mediated by the UPS as observed for melatonin. The similarities of these indole compounds are not sufficient to confer synergistic functions in P. falciparum cell cycle modulation, but could interplay in A. thaliana lateral root formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)646-651
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Eukaryotic Microbiology
Volume60
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

Keywords

  • Indoleamines
  • indoleacetic acid

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