The Stoplight Program: A Proactive Physical Therapy Intervention for Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Lynn Tanner, Susan Sencer, Casey Hooke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chemotherapy may cause neuromuscular impairments that can have life-long effects. The Stoplight Program (SLP) was developed as a proactive physical therapy (PT) intervention directed at impairments in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this program evaluation, we assessed the feasibility of the SLP delivered as part of standard care and identified body function and activity patterns in patients who received the intervention. Children ages 1 to 22 years, diagnosed with ALL, received an assessment by a physical therapist as part of usual care. The SLP intervention used 3 levels to categorize the impairment levels and intensity of PT. Of the children (n = 135) screened, 46% completed 5 intervention visits and 32% completed the program and met discharge criteria. At initial assessment, 46% of children ages 1 to 5 years and 67% of children ages 6 to 22 years had abnormal motor function. Those completing the program tested within the healthy norms. Research is needed on variables that influence adherence to a PT program and the range of functional impairment and activity limitations in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-357
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Keywords

  • exercise
  • growth and development
  • leukemia
  • physical therapy

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