The status of women in academic ophthalmology: Authorship of papers, presentations, and academic promotions

Vasiliki P. Giannakakos, Misha Syed, Susan M. Culican, Jamie B. Rosenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

As the field of ophthalmology has evolved in the last several decades, so has the gender distribution of ophthalmologists. We conducted a narrative review to further characterise the status of women in the realm of publication, presentations, editorial positions, grants, academic promotion, and financial compensation. While the proportion of women publishing, presenting, and filling academic and editorial roles has increased over time, it still does not match that of men. Women are more likely to be first authors instead of senior authors, have lower average h-indices, and are awarded fewer grants. The magnitude of some of these differences is smaller when adjusted for women's shorter career duration on average. Despite increased representation of women in ophthalmology, women continue to receive less compensation for the same work. This review highlights that more can be done to improve gender parity in ophthalmology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-147
Number of pages11
JournalClinical and Experimental Ophthalmology
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

Keywords

  • Grants and subsidies, research
  • gender equity
  • ophthalmology
  • pay equity

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Review

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