The specification as an instrument for colonizing Oceti Sakowin lands

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In the 19th century, the United States of America positioned itself for industrial expansion by identifying potential territories for raw materials. Political agreements, such as treaties, formed the initial instruments for converting large swaths of indigenous lands into material territories. As treaty negotiations ended with the 1871 Indian Appropriations Act, new forms of agreements replaced them. Specifications emerged in architecture and construction as authoring tools for remote building sites as well as instruments for further delineating unresolved territories. As settlements filled presumably unoccupied lands, a growing need for lumber appeared. White pine timber offered a solution with sources identified in the northern plains, a region occupied by Oceti Sakowin peoples. A close examination of the treaties and specifications written for white pine extraction and production reveals the specification as a political instrument for colonizing Oceti Sakowin lands.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHistory of Construction Cultures - Proceedings of the 7th International Congress on Construction History, 7ICCH 2021
EditorsJoão Mascarenhas-Mateus, Manuel Marques Caiado, Ivo Veiga, Ana Paula Pires
Place of PublicationLisbon, Portugal
PublisherCRC Press/Balkema
Pages256-261
Number of pages6
Volume1
ISBN (Print) 9781032001999
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022
Externally publishedYes
Event7th International Congress on Construction History, 7ICCH 2021 - Lisbon, Portugal
Duration: Jul 12 2021Jul 16 2021

Publication series

NameHistory of Construction Cultures - Proceedings of the 7th International Congress on Construction History, 7ICCH 2021
Volume1

Conference

Conference7th International Congress on Construction History, 7ICCH 2021
Country/TerritoryPortugal
CityLisbon
Period7/12/217/16/21

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 the Author(s).

Cite this