The sound of one hand: A wrist-mounted bio-acoustic fingertip gesture interface

Brian Amento, Will Hill, Loren Terveen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two hundred and fifty years ago the Japanese Zen master Hakuin asked the question, "What is the Sound of the Single Hand?" This koan has long served as an aid to meditation but it also describes our new interaction technique. We discovered that gentle fingertip gestures such as tapping, rubbing, and flicking make quiet sounds that travel by bone conduction throughout the hand. A small wristbandmounted contact microphone can reliably and inexpensively sense these sounds. We harnessed this "sound in the hand" phenomenon to build a wristband-mounted bioacoustic fingertip gesture interface. The bio-acoustic interface recognizes some common gestures that state-of-the-art glove and image-processing techniques capture but in a smaller, mobile package.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings
EditorsL. Terveen, D. Wixon, E. Comstock, A. Sasse
Pages724-725
Number of pages2
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
EventConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Apr 20 2002Apr 25 2002

Other

OtherConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period4/20/024/25/02

Keywords

  • Acoustics
  • Fingers
  • Gestural interfaces
  • Gestures
  • Human-computer interaction
  • Mobile devices
  • Wrist

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  • Cite this

    Amento, B., Hill, W., & Terveen, L. (2002). The sound of one hand: A wrist-mounted bio-acoustic fingertip gesture interface. In L. Terveen, D. Wixon, E. Comstock, & A. Sasse (Eds.), Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings (pp. 724-725)