The somatic autosomal mutation matrix in cancer genomes

Nuri A. Temiz, Duncan E. Donohue, Albino Bacolla, Karen M. Vasquez, David N. Cooper, Uma Mudunuri, Joseph Ivanic, Regina Z. Cer, Ming Yi, Robert M. Stephens, Jack R. Collins, Brian T. Luke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

DNA damage in somatic cells originates from both environmental and endogenous sources, giving rise to mutations through multiple mechanisms. When these mutations affect the function of critical genes, cancer may ensue. Although identifying genomic subsets of mutated genes may inform therapeutic options, a systematic survey of tumor mutational spectra is required to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of mutagenesis involved in cancer etiology. Recent studies have presented genome-wide sets of somatic mutations as a 96-element vector, a procedure that only captures the immediate neighbors of the mutated nucleotide. Herein, we present a 32 × 12 mutation matrix that captures the nucleotide pattern two nucleotides upstream and downstream of the mutation. A somatic autosomal mutation matrix (SAMM) was constructed from tumor-specific mutations derived from each of 909 individual cancer genomes harboring a total of 10,681,843 single-base substitutions. In addition, mechanistic template mutation matrices (MTMMs) representing oxidative DNA damage, ultraviolet-induced DNA damage, 5mCpG deamination, and APOBEC-mediated cytosine mutation, are presented. MTMMs were mapped to the individual tumor SAMMs to determine the maximum contribution of each mutational mechanism to the overall mutation pattern. A Manhattan distance across all SAMM elements between any two tumor genomes was used to determine their relative distance. Employing this metric, 89.5 % of all tumor genomes were found to have a nearest neighbor from the same tissue of origin. When a distance-dependent 6-nearest neighbor classifier was used, 86.9 % of all SAMMs were assigned to the correct tissue of origin. Thus, although tumors from different tissues may have similar mutation patterns, their SAMMs often display signatures that are characteristic of specific tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)851-864
Number of pages14
JournalHuman Genetics
Volume134
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 23 2015

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Genome
Mutation
Neoplasms
DNA Damage
Nucleotides
Deamination
Neoplasm Genes
Cytosine
Mutagenesis

Cite this

Temiz, N. A., Donohue, D. E., Bacolla, A., Vasquez, K. M., Cooper, D. N., Mudunuri, U., ... Luke, B. T. (2015). The somatic autosomal mutation matrix in cancer genomes. Human Genetics, 134(8), 851-864. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00439-015-1566-1

The somatic autosomal mutation matrix in cancer genomes. / Temiz, Nuri A.; Donohue, Duncan E.; Bacolla, Albino; Vasquez, Karen M.; Cooper, David N.; Mudunuri, Uma; Ivanic, Joseph; Cer, Regina Z.; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert M.; Collins, Jack R.; Luke, Brian T.

In: Human Genetics, Vol. 134, No. 8, 23.08.2015, p. 851-864.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Temiz, NA, Donohue, DE, Bacolla, A, Vasquez, KM, Cooper, DN, Mudunuri, U, Ivanic, J, Cer, RZ, Yi, M, Stephens, RM, Collins, JR & Luke, BT 2015, 'The somatic autosomal mutation matrix in cancer genomes', Human Genetics, vol. 134, no. 8, pp. 851-864. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00439-015-1566-1
Temiz NA, Donohue DE, Bacolla A, Vasquez KM, Cooper DN, Mudunuri U et al. The somatic autosomal mutation matrix in cancer genomes. Human Genetics. 2015 Aug 23;134(8):851-864. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00439-015-1566-1
Temiz, Nuri A. ; Donohue, Duncan E. ; Bacolla, Albino ; Vasquez, Karen M. ; Cooper, David N. ; Mudunuri, Uma ; Ivanic, Joseph ; Cer, Regina Z. ; Yi, Ming ; Stephens, Robert M. ; Collins, Jack R. ; Luke, Brian T. / The somatic autosomal mutation matrix in cancer genomes. In: Human Genetics. 2015 ; Vol. 134, No. 8. pp. 851-864.
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