The significance of Candida in the human respiratory tract: Our evolving understanding

Kathryn M. Pendleton, Gary B. Huffnagle, Robert P. Dickson

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Candida is an opportunistic pathogen and the most commonly isolated fungal genus in humans. Though Candida is often detected in respiratory specimens from humans with and without lung disease, its significance remains undetermined. While historically considered a commensal organism with low virulence potential, the status of Candida as an innocent bystander has recently been called into question by both clinical observations and animal experimentation. We here review what is currently known and yet to be determined about the clinical, microbiological and pathophysiological significance of the detection of Candida spp. in the human respiratory tract.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberftx029
JournalPathogens and Disease
Volume75
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Candida
  • Colonization
  • Respiratory tract

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