The role of the pediatric pharmacist in precision medicine and clinical pharmacogenomics for children

Advocacy and Research Committees

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

With the initiatives by the National Institutes of Health and the US Food and Drug Administration, pharmacogenomics is transitioning from the laboratory to patient care. Nearly 200 drug products now contain pharmacogenomic information as part of their labeling; many of these products are commonly used in the pediatric population. Because pharmacogenomic testing can provide patient-specific predictors for drug response, pharmacists are positioned to assume a leadership role in pharmacogenomic testing, clinical interpretation of results, and recommendations for individualization of drug therapy. Opportunities for pharmacists exist in both inpatient and outpatient settings, such as pharmacist-managed clinical pharmacogenomics consultation services and educating patients and families about pharmacogenomic testing. Given the potential for genetic and age-dependent factors to influence drug selection and dosing, pediatric pharmacists should be involved in the development of dosing recommendations and interprofessional practice guidelines regarding pharmacogenomic testing in pediatric patients. Opportunities to become knowledgeable and competent in pharmacogenomics extend from coursework as part of the pharmacy curriculum to postgraduate education (e.g., residencies, fellowship, continuing education). The Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group acknowledges a need for increased education of both students and practicing pharmacists with consideration for infants and children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)499-501
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Pediatric Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Keywords

  • Pediatrics
  • Pharmacist
  • Pharmacogenetics
  • Pharmacogenomics
  • Precision medicine

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