The Role of Self-Efficacy and Identity in Mediating the Effects of STEM Support Experiences

Moin Syed, Eileen L. Zurbriggen, Martin M. Chemers, Barbara K. Goza, Steve Bearman, Faye J. Crosby, Jerome M. Shaw, Lisa Hunter, Elizabeth M. Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We report results from two studies testing the Mediation Model of Research Experiences, which posits that science (or engineering) self-efficacy and identity as a scientist (or engineer) mediate the association between support programs and students’ commitment to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. Study 1 included 502 matriculated and recently graduated undergraduate STEM students. Structural equation modeling analyses indicated that research experience, instrumental mentoring, and involvement in a community of scientists were associated with commitment to a STEM career, mediated through science/engineering self-efficacy and identity as a scientist/engineer. There were few interactions with ethnicity and none with gender. In Study 2, 63 undergraduate students in science/engineering support programs were surveyed with a similar instrument at the beginning and end of their programs. Pre–post analyses indicated that increases over time in community involvement were associated with increases in science/engineering self-efficacy, and increases over time in science/engineering identity were associated with increased commitment to a STEM career. Taken together, these two studies show the importance of psychological processes such as identity and self-efficacy in understanding the specific ways in which science/engineering support programs lead to enhanced commitment to a career in STEM among White and underrepresented minority undergraduate students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnalyses of Social Issues and Public Policy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

mathematics
engineering science
self-efficacy
engineering
science
career
commitment
experience
engineer
student
mentoring
community
mediation
effect
ethnicity
minority
gender
interaction
programme

Cite this

Syed, M., Zurbriggen, E. L., Chemers, M. M., Goza, B. K., Bearman, S., Crosby, F. J., ... Morgan, E. M. (Accepted/In press). The Role of Self-Efficacy and Identity in Mediating the Effects of STEM Support Experiences. Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy. https://doi.org/10.1111/asap.12170

The Role of Self-Efficacy and Identity in Mediating the Effects of STEM Support Experiences. / Syed, Moin; Zurbriggen, Eileen L.; Chemers, Martin M.; Goza, Barbara K.; Bearman, Steve; Crosby, Faye J.; Shaw, Jerome M.; Hunter, Lisa; Morgan, Elizabeth M.

In: Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Syed, Moin ; Zurbriggen, Eileen L. ; Chemers, Martin M. ; Goza, Barbara K. ; Bearman, Steve ; Crosby, Faye J. ; Shaw, Jerome M. ; Hunter, Lisa ; Morgan, Elizabeth M. / The Role of Self-Efficacy and Identity in Mediating the Effects of STEM Support Experiences. In: Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy. 2018.
@article{99e60aa023aa44098fbf164575812037,
title = "The Role of Self-Efficacy and Identity in Mediating the Effects of STEM Support Experiences",
abstract = "We report results from two studies testing the Mediation Model of Research Experiences, which posits that science (or engineering) self-efficacy and identity as a scientist (or engineer) mediate the association between support programs and students’ commitment to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. Study 1 included 502 matriculated and recently graduated undergraduate STEM students. Structural equation modeling analyses indicated that research experience, instrumental mentoring, and involvement in a community of scientists were associated with commitment to a STEM career, mediated through science/engineering self-efficacy and identity as a scientist/engineer. There were few interactions with ethnicity and none with gender. In Study 2, 63 undergraduate students in science/engineering support programs were surveyed with a similar instrument at the beginning and end of their programs. Pre–post analyses indicated that increases over time in community involvement were associated with increases in science/engineering self-efficacy, and increases over time in science/engineering identity were associated with increased commitment to a STEM career. Taken together, these two studies show the importance of psychological processes such as identity and self-efficacy in understanding the specific ways in which science/engineering support programs lead to enhanced commitment to a career in STEM among White and underrepresented minority undergraduate students.",
author = "Moin Syed and Zurbriggen, {Eileen L.} and Chemers, {Martin M.} and Goza, {Barbara K.} and Steve Bearman and Crosby, {Faye J.} and Shaw, {Jerome M.} and Lisa Hunter and Morgan, {Elizabeth M.}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/asap.12170",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy",
issn = "1529-7489",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Role of Self-Efficacy and Identity in Mediating the Effects of STEM Support Experiences

AU - Syed, Moin

AU - Zurbriggen, Eileen L.

AU - Chemers, Martin M.

AU - Goza, Barbara K.

AU - Bearman, Steve

AU - Crosby, Faye J.

AU - Shaw, Jerome M.

AU - Hunter, Lisa

AU - Morgan, Elizabeth M.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - We report results from two studies testing the Mediation Model of Research Experiences, which posits that science (or engineering) self-efficacy and identity as a scientist (or engineer) mediate the association between support programs and students’ commitment to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. Study 1 included 502 matriculated and recently graduated undergraduate STEM students. Structural equation modeling analyses indicated that research experience, instrumental mentoring, and involvement in a community of scientists were associated with commitment to a STEM career, mediated through science/engineering self-efficacy and identity as a scientist/engineer. There were few interactions with ethnicity and none with gender. In Study 2, 63 undergraduate students in science/engineering support programs were surveyed with a similar instrument at the beginning and end of their programs. Pre–post analyses indicated that increases over time in community involvement were associated with increases in science/engineering self-efficacy, and increases over time in science/engineering identity were associated with increased commitment to a STEM career. Taken together, these two studies show the importance of psychological processes such as identity and self-efficacy in understanding the specific ways in which science/engineering support programs lead to enhanced commitment to a career in STEM among White and underrepresented minority undergraduate students.

AB - We report results from two studies testing the Mediation Model of Research Experiences, which posits that science (or engineering) self-efficacy and identity as a scientist (or engineer) mediate the association between support programs and students’ commitment to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. Study 1 included 502 matriculated and recently graduated undergraduate STEM students. Structural equation modeling analyses indicated that research experience, instrumental mentoring, and involvement in a community of scientists were associated with commitment to a STEM career, mediated through science/engineering self-efficacy and identity as a scientist/engineer. There were few interactions with ethnicity and none with gender. In Study 2, 63 undergraduate students in science/engineering support programs were surveyed with a similar instrument at the beginning and end of their programs. Pre–post analyses indicated that increases over time in community involvement were associated with increases in science/engineering self-efficacy, and increases over time in science/engineering identity were associated with increased commitment to a STEM career. Taken together, these two studies show the importance of psychological processes such as identity and self-efficacy in understanding the specific ways in which science/engineering support programs lead to enhanced commitment to a career in STEM among White and underrepresented minority undergraduate students.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85055726441&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85055726441&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/asap.12170

DO - 10.1111/asap.12170

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85055726441

JO - Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy

JF - Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy

SN - 1529-7489

ER -