The Role of Parental Perceptions of Tic Frequency and Intensity in Predicting Tic-Related Functional Impairment in Youth with Chronic Tic Disorders

Flint M. Espil, Matthew R. Capriotti, Christine A. Conelea, Douglas W. Woods

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Tic severity is composed of several dimensions. Tic frequency and intensity are two such dimensions, but little empirical data exist regarding their relative contributions to functional impairment in those with chronic tic disorders (CTD). The present study examined the relative contributions of these dimensions in predicting tic-related impairment across several psychosocial domains. Using data collected from parents of youth with CTD, multivariate regression analyses revealed that both tic frequency and intensity predicted tic-related impairment in several areas; including family and peer relationships, school interference, and social endeavors, even when controlling for the presence of comorbid anxiety symptoms and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder diagnostic status. Results showed that tic intensity predicted more variance across more domains than tic frequency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)657-665
Number of pages9
JournalChild psychiatry and human development
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 7 2014

Keywords

  • Functional impairment
  • Tic disorders
  • Tourette syndrome

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Role of Parental Perceptions of Tic Frequency and Intensity in Predicting Tic-Related Functional Impairment in Youth with Chronic Tic Disorders'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this