The role of interpersonal personality traits and reassurance seeking in eating disorder symptoms and depressive symptoms among women with bulimia nervosa

Tyler B. Mason, Jason M. Lavender, Stephen A. Wonderlich, Ross D. Crosby, Thomas E. Joiner, James E. Mitchell, Scott J. Crow, Marjorie H. Klein, Daniel Le Grange, Anna M. Bardone-Cone, Carol B. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction The role of interpersonal factors has been proposed in various models of eating disorder (ED) psychopathology and treatment. We examined the independent and interactive contributions of two interpersonal-focused personality traits (i.e., social avoidance and insecure attachment) and reassurance seeking in relation to global ED psychopathology and depressive symptoms among women with bulimia nervosa (BN). Method Participants were 204 adult women with full or subclinical BN who completed a battery of self-report questionnaires. Hierarchical multiple OLS regressions including main effects and interaction terms were used to analyze the data. Results Main effects were found for social avoidance and insecure attachment in association with global ED psychopathology and depressive symptoms. In addition, two-way interactions between social avoidance and reassurance seeking were observed for both global ED psychopathology and depressive symptoms. In general, reassurance seeking strengthened the association between social avoidance and global ED psychopathology and depressive symptoms. Conclusion These results demonstrate the importance of reassurance seeking in psychopathology among women with BN who display personality features characterized by social avoidance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-171
Number of pages7
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume68
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

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