The Role of Health Insurance in Patient Reported Satisfaction with Bladder Management in Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Due to Spinal Cord Injury

Temitope Rude, Odinachi Moghalu, John Stoffel, Sara Lenherr, Jeremy B. Myers, Sean Elliott, Blayne Welk, Jennifer S. Herrick, Angela P. Presson, David A. Ginsberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE: Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction is a significant source of morbidity for individuals with spinal cord injury and is managed with a range of treatment options that differ in efficacy, tolerability and cost. The effect of insurance coverage on bladder management, symptoms and quality of life is not known. We hypothesized that private insurance is associated with fewer bladder symptoms and better quality of life. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a cross-sectional, retrospective analysis of 1,226 surveys collected as part of the prospective Neurogenic Bladder Research Group SCI Registry. We included patients with complete insurance information, which was classified as private or public insurance. The relationship between insurance and bladder management, bladder symptoms and quality of life was modeled using multinomial logistic regression analysis. Spinal cord injury quality of life was measured by the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score. RESULTS: We identified 654 privately insured and 572 publicly insured individuals. The demographics of these groups differed by race, education, prevalence of chronic pain and bladder management. Publicly insured patients were more likely to be treated with indwelling catheters or spontaneous voiding and less likely to take bladder medication compared to those with private insurance. On multivariate analysis insurance type was not associated with differences in bladder symptoms (total Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score) or in urinary quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: There is an association between insurance coverage and the type of bladder management used following spinal cord injury, as publicly insured patients are more likely to be treated with indwelling catheters. However, insurance status, controlling for bladder management, did not impact bladder symptoms or quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-218
Number of pages6
JournalThe Journal of urology
Volume205
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2021

Keywords

  • health systems plans
  • neurogenic
  • patient-centered care
  • urinary bladder
  • urinary catheterization

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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