The Role of Follicle-stimulating Hormone in Vascular Dysfunction Observed in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

Erica J Roelofs, Donald R. Dengel, Qi Wang, James S. Hodges, Julia Steinberger, K. Scott Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Childhood cancer survivors who receive a hematopoietic cell transplantation HCT are at increased risk for follicle-stimulating hormone FSH abnormalities, which may have a substantial negative impact on vascular function. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of vascular function with FSH in HCT recipients, non-HCT recipients and healthy controls. The study included childhood cancer survivors who were HCT recipients n=24 and non-HCT recipients n=308, and a control group of healthy siblings n=211 all between 9 and 18 years old. Vascular measures of carotid artery structure and function compliance and distensibility, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and endothelial-independent dilation were measured using ultrasound imaging. A fasting blood sample was collected to measure hormone levels. FSH was significantly higher in HCT recipients compared with non-HCT recipients and healthy controls P<0.01. Carotid compliance and distensibility were significantly lower in HCT and non-HCT recipients compared with healthy controls P<0.05. Higher FSH was associated with decreased carotid compliance P<0.05. This study's results suggest that higher levels of FSH in HCT recipients may result in significant reductions in vascular function compared with non-HCT recipients and healthy controls. Therefore, gonadotropin endocrine dysfunction, particularly abnormal FSH levels, may be an underlying mechanism of vascular dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E695-E700
JournalJournal of pediatric hematology/oncology
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported by the National Institutes of Health (grants R01 CA113930 [to J.S.] and R01CA112530 [to K.S.B.]), the General Clinical Research Center Program (grant M01-RR00400), National Center for Research Resources (grant 1UL1-RR033183), and the Clinical and Translational Science Institute at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities (grant UL1TR000114). Statistical support was provided by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health Award Number UL1TR000114.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • brachial artery
  • carotid artery
  • endocrine
  • flow-mediated dilation
  • ultrasound
  • vascular function

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