The Role of Bone Marrow, Peripheral Blood Stem Cells, and Cord Blood Hemopoietic Stem Cells in Autologous, Related, and Unrelated Transplants

Rachael Hough, John E. Wagner

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Transplantation of haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) has cured thousands of children and adults with life-threatening malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Today, HSC are most commonly obtained from bone marrow, hematopoietic growth factor mobilized peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood either from the patient themselves, or from an HLA-matched or mismatched related donor, unrelated adult volunteer donor, or from banked unrelated umbilical cord blood. Each stem cell source has well-defined advantages and disadvantages. This chapter reviews the key advances made in the field of HSC transplantation, the current application, complications, and limitations of this technology and postulates how HSC therapies may evolve in future years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTissue and Cell Clinical Use
Subtitle of host publicationAn Essential Guide
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Pages312-331
Number of pages20
ISBN (Print)9781405198257
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2 2012

Keywords

  • Allogeneic
  • Autologous
  • Haemopoietic stem cell transplantation
  • Haploidentical
  • Umbilical cord blood

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