The relative contributions of the abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat depots to cardiometabolic risk in youth

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat, independent of total body fat, with cardiometabolic risk factors and insulin resistance among youth. Visceral and subcutaneous fat, percentage total body fat, insulin resistance (adjusted for lean body mass: Mlbm), blood pressure, glucose, insulin and lipids were obtained in 472 youth ages 6-18 years. Linear regression, adjusted for age, sex, race, Tanner stage and percentage total body fat, was used to evaluate associations of visceral and subcutaneous fat with cardiometabolic risk factors. Visceral fat was associated inversely with Mlbm (P = 0.003) and positively with fasting insulin (P = 0.002) and triglycerides (P = 0.002). Visceral fat levels above the mean were associated inversely with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (P = 0.002), and positively with systolic blood pressure (P <0.0001) and non-HDL cholesterol (P <0.0001). Subcutaneous fat was associated inversely with Mlbm (P = 0.003) and HDL cholesterol (P <0.05), and positively with fasting glucose (P <0.05), fasting insulin (P = 0.0003), systolic blood pressure (P = 0.005) and triglycerides (P = 0.003). Subcutaneous fat levels above the mean were associated with non-HDL cholesterol (P = 0.0002). These findings suggest that there may be a threshold level of visceral and subcutaneous fat (regardless of total body fat), that when exceeded in childhood, is more likely to be associated with many cardiometabolic risk factors. Triglycerides and insulin resistance appear to be associated with these fat depots at even lower thresholds of abdominal adiposity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-107
Number of pages7
JournalClinical obesity
Volume4
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 1 2014

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Abdominal Subcutaneous Fat
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Subcutaneous Fat
Adipose Tissue
Blood Pressure
Insulin Resistance
Fasting
Triglycerides
Insulin
HDL Cholesterol
Adiposity
Blood Glucose
Linear Models
Fats
Lipids
Glucose

Cite this

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title = "The relative contributions of the abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat depots to cardiometabolic risk in youth",
abstract = "The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat, independent of total body fat, with cardiometabolic risk factors and insulin resistance among youth. Visceral and subcutaneous fat, percentage total body fat, insulin resistance (adjusted for lean body mass: Mlbm), blood pressure, glucose, insulin and lipids were obtained in 472 youth ages 6-18 years. Linear regression, adjusted for age, sex, race, Tanner stage and percentage total body fat, was used to evaluate associations of visceral and subcutaneous fat with cardiometabolic risk factors. Visceral fat was associated inversely with Mlbm (P = 0.003) and positively with fasting insulin (P = 0.002) and triglycerides (P = 0.002). Visceral fat levels above the mean were associated inversely with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (P = 0.002), and positively with systolic blood pressure (P <0.0001) and non-HDL cholesterol (P <0.0001). Subcutaneous fat was associated inversely with Mlbm (P = 0.003) and HDL cholesterol (P <0.05), and positively with fasting glucose (P <0.05), fasting insulin (P = 0.0003), systolic blood pressure (P = 0.005) and triglycerides (P = 0.003). Subcutaneous fat levels above the mean were associated with non-HDL cholesterol (P = 0.0002). These findings suggest that there may be a threshold level of visceral and subcutaneous fat (regardless of total body fat), that when exceeded in childhood, is more likely to be associated with many cardiometabolic risk factors. Triglycerides and insulin resistance appear to be associated with these fat depots at even lower thresholds of abdominal adiposity.",
author = "Kelly, {A. S.} and Dengel, {D. R.} and J. Hodges and L. Zhang and A. Moran and L. Chow and Sinaiko, {A. R.} and J. Steinberger",
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T1 - The relative contributions of the abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat depots to cardiometabolic risk in youth

AU - Kelly, A. S.

AU - Dengel, D. R.

AU - Hodges, J.

AU - Zhang, L.

AU - Moran, A.

AU - Chow, L.

AU - Sinaiko, A. R.

AU - Steinberger, J.

PY - 2014/4/1

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N2 - The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat, independent of total body fat, with cardiometabolic risk factors and insulin resistance among youth. Visceral and subcutaneous fat, percentage total body fat, insulin resistance (adjusted for lean body mass: Mlbm), blood pressure, glucose, insulin and lipids were obtained in 472 youth ages 6-18 years. Linear regression, adjusted for age, sex, race, Tanner stage and percentage total body fat, was used to evaluate associations of visceral and subcutaneous fat with cardiometabolic risk factors. Visceral fat was associated inversely with Mlbm (P = 0.003) and positively with fasting insulin (P = 0.002) and triglycerides (P = 0.002). Visceral fat levels above the mean were associated inversely with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (P = 0.002), and positively with systolic blood pressure (P <0.0001) and non-HDL cholesterol (P <0.0001). Subcutaneous fat was associated inversely with Mlbm (P = 0.003) and HDL cholesterol (P <0.05), and positively with fasting glucose (P <0.05), fasting insulin (P = 0.0003), systolic blood pressure (P = 0.005) and triglycerides (P = 0.003). Subcutaneous fat levels above the mean were associated with non-HDL cholesterol (P = 0.0002). These findings suggest that there may be a threshold level of visceral and subcutaneous fat (regardless of total body fat), that when exceeded in childhood, is more likely to be associated with many cardiometabolic risk factors. Triglycerides and insulin resistance appear to be associated with these fat depots at even lower thresholds of abdominal adiposity.

AB - The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat, independent of total body fat, with cardiometabolic risk factors and insulin resistance among youth. Visceral and subcutaneous fat, percentage total body fat, insulin resistance (adjusted for lean body mass: Mlbm), blood pressure, glucose, insulin and lipids were obtained in 472 youth ages 6-18 years. Linear regression, adjusted for age, sex, race, Tanner stage and percentage total body fat, was used to evaluate associations of visceral and subcutaneous fat with cardiometabolic risk factors. Visceral fat was associated inversely with Mlbm (P = 0.003) and positively with fasting insulin (P = 0.002) and triglycerides (P = 0.002). Visceral fat levels above the mean were associated inversely with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (P = 0.002), and positively with systolic blood pressure (P <0.0001) and non-HDL cholesterol (P <0.0001). Subcutaneous fat was associated inversely with Mlbm (P = 0.003) and HDL cholesterol (P <0.05), and positively with fasting glucose (P <0.05), fasting insulin (P = 0.0003), systolic blood pressure (P = 0.005) and triglycerides (P = 0.003). Subcutaneous fat levels above the mean were associated with non-HDL cholesterol (P = 0.0002). These findings suggest that there may be a threshold level of visceral and subcutaneous fat (regardless of total body fat), that when exceeded in childhood, is more likely to be associated with many cardiometabolic risk factors. Triglycerides and insulin resistance appear to be associated with these fat depots at even lower thresholds of abdominal adiposity.

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VL - 4

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