The relationship of neuronal activity within the sensori-motor region of the subthalamic nucleus to speech

Peter Watson, Erwin B. Montgomery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Microelectrode recordings of human sensori-motor subthalamic neuronal activity during spoken sentence and syllable-repetition tasks provided an opportunity to evaluate the relationship between changes in neuronal activities and specific aspects of these vocal behaviors. Observed patterns of neuronal activity included a build up of activity in anticipation of the start of the utterance, a marked reduction in activity associated with the start of the utterance, and a burst of activity during the course of the sentence between the noun phrase and the verb phrase. Overall, changes of neuronal activity were more robust for the sentence repetition task. These data suggest that the basal ganglia play a role in generating meaningful speech utterances, which may parallel its role in complex sequential limb movements. It is possible that the basal ganglia play a role in generating the syntactical structure of language.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-240
Number of pages8
JournalBrain and Language
Volume97
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was funded in part by a research grant from the American Parkinson’s Disease Association.

Keywords

  • Basal ganglia
  • Microelectrode recording
  • Speech
  • Subthalamic nucleus
  • Syntax

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The relationship of neuronal activity within the sensori-motor region of the subthalamic nucleus to speech'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this