The relationship between self-discrepancies and affective states: The moderating roles of self-monitoring and standpoints on the self

Melvin E. Gonnerman, Christopher P. Parker, Howard Lavine, Joseph Huff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using self-discrepancy theory as a theoretical framework, this study examines the interactive effects of self-monitoring and type of self-guide (i.e., own vs. other standpoint) on the relationship between self-discrepancies and affective states. Over two sessions, 294 undergraduates completed the Self-Monitoring Scale, the Selves Questionnaire (either from the own or other standpoint), the Beck Depression Inventory, the Hopkins Symptom Checklist, and the Social Anxiety subscale of the Self-Consciousness Scale. For low self-monitors, depression and anxiety were predicted only by self-discrepancies from the own standpoint on the self. For high self-monitors, depression and anxiety were more strongly predicted by self-discrepancies from the other than the own standpoint on the self. The authors discuss the role of individual differences in understanding when self-discrepancies have implications for individuals' affective states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)810-819
Number of pages10
JournalPersonality and social psychology bulletin
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2000

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