The relationship between price and retail concentration: Evidence from the US food industry

Vardges Hovhannisyan, Clare Cho, Marin Bozic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study utilises the product barcode, store and retail real estate data to obtain consistent estimates of the effects of retail market concentration on food prices in the USA. Our disaggregated data allow for an identification strategy that corrects for the endogeneity of concentration in the concentration-price relationship. Findings from an instrumental variables fixed-effects model indicate that prices rise with retail concentration, and that ignoring endogeneity results in a severe downward bias. A simulation analysis finds that a 5 per cent increase in concentration would increase prices by 18 per cent and decrease food consumption by 2-5 per cent. Our findings suggest mergers in the food industry could inadvertently lead to adverse effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-345
Number of pages27
JournalEuropean Review of Agricultural Economics
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Food Industry
food industry
retail marketing
food prices
barcoding
Food
food consumption
adverse effects
Food industry
Retail
Endogeneity

Keywords

  • endogeneity of retail concentration
  • instrumental variables fixed-effects regression
  • retail concentration
  • retail food price

Cite this

The relationship between price and retail concentration : Evidence from the US food industry. / Hovhannisyan, Vardges; Cho, Clare; Bozic, Marin.

In: European Review of Agricultural Economics, Vol. 46, No. 2, 01.01.2019, p. 319-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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