The Relationship between Prenatal Antidepressant Use and the Decision to Breastfeed among Women Enrolled in a Randomized Exercise Intervention Trial

Beth A Lewis, Katie J Schuver, Dwenda Gjerdingen, Melissa D Avery, John Sirard, Bess H. Marcus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite the numerous health benefits associated with breastfeeding, only 49% of postpartum women in the United States breastfeed at 6 months. Therefore, it is important to understand factors that may influence a woman's decision to breastfeed. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between prenatal antidepressant use and the decision to breastfeed among postpartum women. Methods: Participants were postpartum women (N = 87) who had participated in a randomized trial examining the efficacy of a 6-month exercise intervention for the prevention of postpartum depression (2009-2012). Participants were recruited from the upper Midwest and were at risk for postpartum depression. Participants completed telephone-based questionnaires assessing their prenatal antidepressant use and breastfeeding behavior. Results: Seventeen percent of the participants took an antidepressant medication during pregnancy and 91% breastfed at birth. After controlling for baseline depressive symptoms, body mass index, and condition assignment, participants who were taking an antidepressant during pregnancy were less likely to initiate breastfeeding than participants who were not taking an antidepressant during pregnancy, β = 2.042, P <.05 (odds ratio = 0.130; 95% confidence interval, 0.024-0.696). Conclusion: Our study indicates that prenatal antidepressant medication use may be a potential barrier to breastfeeding initiation. Additional research is needed to better understand the factors that play a role in the relationship between prenatal antidepressant use and breastfeeding initiation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)NP67-NP72
JournalJournal of Human Lactation
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

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Antidepressive Agents
Breast Feeding
Exercise
Postpartum Period
Postpartum Depression
Pregnancy
Insurance Benefits
Telephone
Body Mass Index
Odds Ratio
Parturition
Confidence Intervals
Depression
Research

Keywords

  • Antidepressants
  • Breastfeeding
  • Exercise
  • Postpartum depression

Cite this

The Relationship between Prenatal Antidepressant Use and the Decision to Breastfeed among Women Enrolled in a Randomized Exercise Intervention Trial. / Lewis, Beth A; Schuver, Katie J; Gjerdingen, Dwenda; Avery, Melissa D; Sirard, John; Marcus, Bess H.

In: Journal of Human Lactation, Vol. 32, No. 3, 01.08.2016, p. NP67-NP72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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