The relationship between global and information processing factors and self-perceived risky driving among older adults

Curtis M. Craig, Samuel J. Levulis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Drivers typically calibrate their driving behavior with their perceived risk of the current driving situation. However, the degree of risky behavior that drivers find acceptable may be affected by individual difference factors, such as gender, cognitive ability, and personality traits. Using a publicly available dataset examining cognitive and personality variables in a sample of older American adults (CogUSA; McArdle, Rodgers, & Willis, 2015), the present study assessed the relationships between global and information processing factors and self-perceived risky driving behavior (after controlling for general self-perceived risk-taking). Global factors included gender, age, and the big five personality traits. Information processing factors were measured by scores on Visual Matching, Incomplete Words, Auditory Working Memory, and Spatial Relations tests. Results indicated that gender, conscientiousness, agreeableness, and visuo-spatial processing predicted increased self-perceived risky driving behavior. The results have implications for the assessment of driving risk factors across ages, as well as the burgeoning field of hazard perception training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages1447-1451
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289531
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
EventHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017 - Austin, United States
Duration: Oct 9 2017Oct 13 2017

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2017-October
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

OtherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017
CountryUnited States
CityAustin
Period10/9/1710/13/17

Fingerprint

traffic behavior
information processing
personality traits
gender
driver
cognitive ability
Hazards
personality
Data storage equipment
Processing

Cite this

Craig, C. M., & Levulis, S. J. (2017). The relationship between global and information processing factors and self-perceived risky driving among older adults. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017 (pp. 1447-1451). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 2017-October). Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213601847

The relationship between global and information processing factors and self-perceived risky driving among older adults. / Craig, Curtis M.; Levulis, Samuel J.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017. Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., 2017. p. 1447-1451 (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 2017-October).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Craig, CM & Levulis, SJ 2017, The relationship between global and information processing factors and self-perceived risky driving among older adults. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, vol. 2017-October, Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., pp. 1447-1451, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017, Austin, United States, 10/9/17. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213601847
Craig CM, Levulis SJ. The relationship between global and information processing factors and self-perceived risky driving among older adults. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017. Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc. 2017. p. 1447-1451. (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society). https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213601847
Craig, Curtis M. ; Levulis, Samuel J. / The relationship between global and information processing factors and self-perceived risky driving among older adults. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2017 International Annual Meeting, HFES 2017. Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., 2017. pp. 1447-1451 (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society).
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