The relationship between acculturation and knowledge of health harms and benefits associated with smoking in the Latino population of Minnesota

Melissa L. Constantine, Todd H. Rockwood, Barbara A. Schillo, Jose William Castellanos, Steven S. Foldes, Jessie E. Saul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: This study sought to examine the relationship between acculturation and the knowledge of smoking and health and perception of benefits associated with smoking within the Latino population of Minnesota. In addition to standard acculturation measures, this study employed a multidimensional model and measures of acculturation. Methods: A telephone and in-person administered survey was conducted across the state of Minnesota with Latino men and women. Results: A total of 804 participants completed the survey, 54% were men. The average age of respondents was 37 years; 81% were foreign born and 68% completed the interview in Spanish. Knowledge of the relationship between smoking and lung cancer (99%) and heart disease (93%) was high. Acculturated respondents indicate a more refined knowledge of the relationship between smoking and health conditions not related to smoking (poor vision and arthritis). Smokers identify more benefits associated with smoking than do non-smokers, with gender (male), education (less than high school) and greater acculturation being significant predictors of perceiving benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)980-983
Number of pages4
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume34
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2009

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Beliefs
  • Health
  • Knowledge
  • Latino
  • Smoking

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