The relation of high school biology courses & students' religious beliefs to college students' knowledge of evolution

Randy Moore, D. Christopher Brooks, Sehoya H Cotner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined how college students' knowledge of evolution is associated with their self-described religious beliefs and the evolution-related content of their high school biology courses. On average, students entering college know little about evolution. Religious beliefs, the absence of evolution-related instruction in high school, and the presence of creationism-related instruction in high school were all associated with significantly lower scores on an evolution exam. We present an ordered logistic model that helps to explain (1) students' diverse views and knowledge of evolution, and (2) why college-level instruction about evolution often fails to significantly affect students' views about evolution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)222-226
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Biology Teacher
Volume73
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011

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high schools
Religion
college students
biology
students
Students
Biological Sciences
school
student
instruction
Logistic Models
logit analysis
logistics

Keywords

  • Evolution
  • high school biology
  • religion

Cite this

The relation of high school biology courses & students' religious beliefs to college students' knowledge of evolution. / Moore, Randy; Brooks, D. Christopher; Cotner, Sehoya H.

In: American Biology Teacher, Vol. 73, No. 4, 01.04.2011, p. 222-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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