The Relation Between Popularity and Achievement. A Longitudinal Test of the Lateral Transmission of Value Hypothesis

Geoffrey Maruyama, Norman Miller, Rolf Holtz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Data from a longitudinal study of school desegregation were used to examine the relation between normative social influence processes and academic achievement in order to test theoretical models of how school desegregation produces benefit. Subjects were white, Mexican-American, and black elementary school children who were measured once prior to and twice after desegregation of their schools. For all groups, analyses using structural equation techniques showed that, contrary to the lateral transmission of values hypothesis, which views social influence processes as shaping academic achievement, "causal influence" did not flow from social acceptance to academic achievement; instead, achievement appeared to affect subsequent social acceptance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)730-741
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1986

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