The reactive oxygen scavenger dimethylthiourea does not improve canine renal graft survival after 72-hour cold storage

D. C. Wahoff, A. J. Matas, B. E. Papalois, J. E. Everett, L. A. Nelson, D. E.R. Sutherland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been found to play a role in ischemic and reperfusion injury in the heart, intestine, kidney, lung, and brain. Endogenous scavengers of ROS are depleted during cold storage of organs for transplantation. Adding active oxygen scavengers to the preservation fluid has been postulated to protect organs from injury during preservation-reperfusion. In kidney grafting, this injury is manifested by delayed graft function, which increases the length of hospital stay and the incidence of graft failure. Minimizing ROS during kidney preservation by adding a scavenger to the flush and/or preservation fluid could decrease the incidence of delayed graft function and improve results in clinical transplantation. We examined the effect of dimethylthiourea (DMTU), an oxygen scavenger, on 72-hour hypothermic kidney preservation in a canine renal autograft model. We autotransplanted kidneys in nephrectomized recipients after 72-hour cold flush and storage with either University of Wisconsin solution (UW) alone or UW plus DMTU. Graft function was assessed by serum creatinine levels. Flush and storage with UW containing the antioxidant DMTU did not improve graft survival in 72-hour kidney preservation in dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-53
Number of pages3
JournalResearch in Surgery
Volume6
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1994

Keywords

  • Dimethylthiourea
  • Ischemia-reperfusion
  • Kidney
  • Reactive oxygen scavengers

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