The ram1 mutant of Arabidopsis exhibits severely decreased beta-amylase activity.

Ron J. Laby, Donggiun Kim, Susan I. Gibson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite extensive biochemical analyses, the biological function(s) of plant beta-amylases remains unclear. The fact that beta-amylases degrade starch in vitro suggests that they may play a role in starch metabolism in vivo. beta-Amylases have also been suggested to prevent the accumulation of highly polymerized polysaccharides that might otherwise impede flux through phloem sieve pores. The identification and characterization of a mutant of Arabidopsis var. Columbia with greatly reduced levels of beta-amylase activity is reported here. The reduced beta-amylase 1 (ram1) mutation lies in the gene encoding the major form of beta-amylase in Arabidopsis. Although the Arabidopsis genome contains nine known or putative beta-amylase genes, the fact that the ram1 mutation results in almost complete loss of beta-amylase activity in rosette leaves and inflorescences (stems) indicates that the gene affected by the ram1 mutation is responsible for most of the beta-amylase activity present in these tissues. The leaves of ram1 plants accumulate wild-type levels of starch, soluble sugars, anthocyanin, and chlorophyll. Plants carrying the ram1 mutation also exhibit wild-type rates of phloem exudation and of overall growth. These results suggest that little to no beta-amylase activity is required to maintain normal starch levels, rates of phloem exudation, and overall plant growth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1798-1807
Number of pages10
JournalPlant Physiology
Volume127
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001

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beta-Amylase
beta-amylase
Arabidopsis
mutants
Phloem
Starch
starch
phloem
mutation
Mutation
exudation
Genes
Inflorescence
Anthocyanins
sieves
wild plants
major genes
Chlorophyll
Growth

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The ram1 mutant of Arabidopsis exhibits severely decreased beta-amylase activity. / Laby, Ron J.; Kim, Donggiun; Gibson, Susan I.

In: Plant Physiology, Vol. 127, No. 4, 01.12.2001, p. 1798-1807.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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