The prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of high‐risk and problem drinking at an industrial worksite

GLORIA R. WEBB, SELINA REDMAN, DEBORAH HENNRIKUS, JOHN A.P. ROSTAS, ROBERT W. SANSON‐FISHER

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

The study of 833 employees aimed to determine the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of high‐risk and problem drinking in an industrial population. Variables measured included stressful life events, neuroticism, job satisfaction, years of service, job classification and type of shift. As measured by a 7‐day retrospective diary, 12.5% of the sample were abstainers, 78.7% were light drinkers and 8.8% were high‐risk drinkers. As measured by the Mortimer‐Filkins test of problem drinking, 79.2% were non‐problem drinkers, 15.2% were presumptive problem drinkers and 5.7% were problem drinkers. Variables that best predicted high–risk drinking were marital status, type of shift and education. Variables that best predicted problem drinking were stressful life events, marital status, education and neuroticism. The results indicate the need for a work‐based intervention and provide information to identify at‐risk employees and assist in the design of appropriate treatment programmes, including assistance with social and other problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)495-507
Number of pages13
JournalBritish Journal of Addiction
Volume85
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1990

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of high‐risk and problem drinking at an industrial worksite'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this