The potential for multi-modal approaches to reading for students with disabilities as found in state reading standards

Christopher Johnstone, Martha Thurlow, Sandra Thompson, Ann T. Clapper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article examines topics found in reading standards for K-12 education and then examines the standards from a perspective of accessibility for students with a variety of sensory and learning disabilities. The article begins by first determining how broad or limiting states' reading standards are in coverage and whether focus on particular standards limits options for students to use multiple methods of interaction with print (e.g., accessing print through visual, audio, tactile, or multiple modalities). A review of standards found that state standards generally fall into the following categories: the acquisition of specific skills; the knowledge of the elements or conventions in language; literacy as an interactive, thinking activity; literacy as a problem-solving tool; and literacy as a catalyst for personal growth. With the exception of specific skill standards, all standards have the potential to be accessed through different modalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-229
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Disability Policy Studies
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008

Bibliographical note

Copyright:
Copyright 2011 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Accessibility
  • Disability
  • Education
  • K-12
  • Reading
  • Standards

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